EVENTS

2020 ISCHE Retreat

ISCHE will hold its 5th international retreat titled Translation & Communication: Protecting Children from Toxic Chemicals at Hardingasete, Norway from June 2-5, 2020. 

Located on a beautiful fjord and the Flgefonna glacier, Hardingasete is described as "rustic luxury" and is the perfect venue to re-energize and connect with a broad community of researchers, clinicians, regulatory and advocacy professionals, and students interested in children's environmental health.  


ISCHE will provide transportation via ferry from the Bergen airport to Hardingasete. The ferry will leave at 2 PM on June 2nd. The ferry ride, which will take 2.5 – 3 hours, will transport you through the Norwegian fjords to Hardangerfjord, the Queen of the Norwegian fjords and one of the most picturesque places in Norway. We highly encourage you to plan your travel arrangements to arrive in time for the ferry.  


There will be an optional field trip to the historic Folgefonna glacier, the third largest glacier in Norway, following the close of the meeting on June 5. ISCHE will provide transportation via bus from Hardingasete to Bergen on June 5 at 10:30 AM (~2 hours) for those not attending the field trip. Those attending the field trip will be transported to the glacier and back to Bergen via ferry/bus.


The cost for registration will be $800 USD until the early-bird deadline of March 1, 2020 and $900 USD after March 1. ISCHE has rented the entire Hardingasete venue and all lodging and food expenses will be included in the registration charge.

 

Please see below a draft agenda for the meeting. 

Draft Agenda

Updated 1/22/20

This is a draft agenda that is subject to change. We will be update this website regularly - please check back for updates.



AGENDA

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Tuesday, June 2nd


2 p.m. - Ferry departs Bergen airport for Hardingasete 

6:00 – 7:00 p.m. – Dinner

7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.- Brief introductions, welcome, and icebreaker activity


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Wednesday, June 3rd

 

7:30 - 8:30 a.m. – Breakfast


 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. – Translation and Communication to Protect Children from Toxic Chemicals

Conducting high-quality research is critical to protect children from toxic chemicals, but it isn’t enough. Scientists need to be able to synthesize and communicate their results to colleagues, policymakers, parents and the public. We need to be able to articulate the importance of observational studies and elevate the role of prevention.

Moderator:

Speakers:



10:00 - 10:30 a.m. - Break


10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Can the omes save us? Do omics technologies hold promisee for improving children's health? 

Moderator:

Speakers:


12:00 – 1:00 p.m. – Lunch


1:00 – 2:30 p.m. [Open for submissions]


2:30 – 3:30 p.m.– State of Children’s Environmental Health in Europe

Moderator:

Speakers:


3:30 - 5:00 p.m. – Working sessions and networking


Session 1: Climate Change - Taking Action to Reduce Society's Emissions 

Children bear the brunt of climate change's effects on survival, health, and well-being. In the last year, ISCHE announced specific short- and long-term steps the Society will take to reduce our greenhouse emissions, including flying less, reducing emissions at meetings, promoting climate action at our institutions, and advocating with policy and business leaders. In this session, we will develop action plans for each of the steps outlined in our climate statement, to create a road map towards reducing emissions as a Society and measuring our progress.

Co-chairs: Brenda Eskenazi, Ruth Etzel, Kam Sripada


Session 2: P Values - Will we miss them when they're gone? 

The New England Journal recently adopted new statistical guidelines. They are concerned primarily with limiting the use of p values, but also with multiple comparisons, unreported comparisons, lack of prior hypotheses, lack of prior analytical plans, and Type 1 error, ie, rejecting the null hypothesis when it is true. Much modern children’s environmental health research uses data sets constructed for another purpose. A detailed analytical plan is rare, and a general analytical plan is usually modified as the analysis proceeds. Control of type 1 error is often mentioned in children's health papers, but seldom pursued in depth. There are compelling reasons for this, led by the extreme difference in time and money between planning, executing, and analyzing a new custom study and using existing data. However, there is growing concern about validity, led by John Ioannididis, author of the provocatively titled “Why most published research findings are false.” There is another side. The field has many agents to study, and relatively insensitive tools to study them with. Discovery is important; replication will weed out the false associations. That’s how science progresses.

Chair: Walter Rogan


5:00 – 6:00 – Happy Hour/Relax/Interact

6:00 – 7:00 – Dinner

7:00 – 8:00 – Social Event (Storytelling)

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Thursday, June 4th

7:30 - 8:30 a.m. – Breakfast


8:30 – 10:00 a.m. – Young Investigators Session

Students and young investigators will present their current work and have the opportunity to solicit feedback. We will also discuss potential opportunities for collaborative research.

Moderator:

Speakers:


10:00 - 10:30 a.m. - Break


10:30  a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Scientist-activism and Careers

Scientists are often wary or uncomfortable translating their science for purposes of action, whether it be written or spoken support of changes to existing policy or engagement with communities or advocacy organizations. Recent criticism of the “activist” scientist requires that we identify when, where, an dhow we as environmental health professionals can be most impactful while retaining our reputations as excellent scientists. In this session we will explore the challenges of embracing translation, while recognizing the relationship between career stage and trajectory. The overall objective of this session to formally identify effective practices for scientists with the goal of preventing or controlling disease in children.

Moderator:

Speakers:


 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. – Lunch


1:00 p.m. – 2.30 p.m.  – Translating Interventions into Real-World Solutions

Intervention studies have provided some of the most convincing evidence for strategies to reduce exposure to environmental toxicants, but progress needs to be made on translating these results to effective real-world solutions and policy changes. We will hear about successes and challenges from intervention studies from around the world and discuss trans-disciplinary solutions to move from science to action. 

Moderator:

Speakers:


2:30 – 4:00 p.m. – Working session and networking


4:00 – 6:00 p.m. – Meeting Products and Possible ISCHE Policy Statements 


6:00 – 8:00 p.m. – Dinner


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Friday, June 5th

 

8:30 – 9:00 a.m. - Herb Needleman Award Presentation

Presenters:​ David Bellinger and Neil Leifer​​​​​


9:00 – 10:00 a.m. – Policy Statement Update and Discussion, Vision for Next Two Years


10:30 a.m. - Bus departs for Bergen or for Folgefonna Glacier (for those attending the field trip)